Monday, June 05, 2006

Questionable Intelligence?

Whilst there can be no doubt that the Police and intelligence services have a duty of care to the general public with regards to doing their utmost to prevent further terror attacks, legitimate questions need to be raised in relation to the Friday raid. It appears that expectations of finding lethal chemicals or a chemical device are rapidly evaporating.

We've been told in the past that terror plots have been foiled, yet we aren't provided with any verifiable details, in the name of "operational security". Yet we also know the Met and MI5 got it hopelessly and tragically wrong in the case of Mr de Menezes, who was shot several times at point blank when mistaken for an underground suicide bomber.

Then, as it appears now, the intelligence was spectacularly wrong. And here too, a suspect has been shot in confused circumstances, possibly by a trigger-happy policeman.

From
The Guardian.

During the raid a 23-year-old Muslim man was shot, and he and his brother were arrested on suspicion of terrorism.

Scotland Yard said yesterday that searches at the property would continue for several days. Sources with responsibility for the security of the transport system, one of the most likely targets of a chemical device, say they have not been made aware the searches have produced any trace of a chemical device, either at the address in east London or elsewhere. "So far nothing from the search bears out the intelligence," said one source.

The Guardian has learned that over the weekend police intensified their planning for dealing with community anger if it turns out the intelligence was wrong.

Security and intelligence officials yesterday defended the decision to raid the house: "We have a duty of care to the general public, we can't do [police anti-terrorist] operations by halves," said one official.

A senior police source explained the police's dilemma: "In other crime you can take a risk to firm up the intelligence. The trouble with this new world of terrorism is you don't have the time, you can't firm up the intelligence to the point you like.

"The public may have to get used to this sort of incident, with the police having to be safe rather than sorry."

Anti-terrorism police yesterday began questioning the man shot in the raid, after his release from hospital. His lawyer named him as Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, who with his brother Abul Koyair, 20, protest their innocence and deny any link to Islamist extremism.

Mr Koyair's solicitor, Julian Young, denied media reports that his client had any criminal convictions. Lawyers for the men also denied a report that Mr Kahar had been shot by his brother after grappling with an armed police officer for his gun.

Mr Kahar's solicitor, Kate Roxburgh, said the 23-year-old Royal Mail worker had been shot in the upper right hand side of his chest, with the bullet exiting through his shoulder on an upwards trajectory. She said his brother had been standing behind Mr Kahar at the time.

Both solicitors said there had been no struggle before the shot was fired without warning, but Ms Roxburgh said Mr Kahar had grabbed the gun after he was shot fearing it would be fired again, leaving him with a burn to his hand from the hot barrel.

3 Comments:

At 8:53 PM, Blogger Richard said...

It's going to be a while before we hear anything 'sensible' about this one, I think, Gert.

However, and yopu can call me the same old, same old .. if you want but...

A./ I can not believe that on a raid such as this, there were no military 'special services' in attendance.

B./ I can not believe that if they were [which I'm sure was the case] that they were not the 'front line'.

C./ I can not believe that anyone not in the 'front line' would/could have fired this shot.

Send me some tinfoil if you like, but to not have the SAS inon an operation like this ... well ... it's beyond belief.

I've said in the past that I believe the UK is becoming a police state -- with this latest [highly likely] fiasco, I'm having even 'stronger' thoughts re the status of our current 'state'.

 
At 4:30 AM, Blogger GraemeAnfinson said...

Hey, those headlines sound familiar. you guys consulting with the NYPD

 
At 2:29 PM, Blogger Gert said...

A Police state, definitely. Controls get tighter everyday and the NIR/ID card scheme will make it all the easier to herd the flock... Sad times.

 

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